NEUROFILES Dr Rebecca Torrance Jenkins
NeuroFiles Education began with the question: how can we teach pupils’ brains to learn, if we ourselves aren’t taught how brains learn? And if we don’t know how our brains’ ability to learn is affected by stress, the school environment, and the mindset and mood that the teacher situates learning in, how can we expect teachers to deliver high quality education? There is currently almost no mention of the brain, or any neuroscience, in the vast majority of Initial Teacher Training programmes; those that do receive it then go on to find themselves in schools where they are a minority and it’s hard to get their voices heard. And how many INSET providers deliver high-quality neuroscientific, psychological and educational research findings? And are qualified to do so? Imagine if we were able to give all teachers a toolkit and an educational structure, based on how their pupils’ brains actually think and work. NeuroFiles Education content is regularly reviewed by a panel of academics working in the field, many well- known even beyond their area of expertise. We include nothing that is not rooted in peer-reviewed scientific research, and share our growing bank of findings with you. Rebecca and David have a wealth of experience – in classroom teaching, as head of department, with published educational research and as advisers on educational policy – we find our combined experience is both invaluable and exclusive.

Education: How the

Brain Learns

© NeuroFiles 2018  - info@neurofiles.co.uk                        

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Educational practice can be transformed by science, just as medical practice was transformed by science Royal Society, 2011.
Educational practice can be transformed by science, just as medical practice was transformed by science Royal Society, 2011.
Contact Contact

© NeuroFiles 2018 - info@neurofiles.co.uk  

Education: How the Brain Learns

NeuroFiles Education began with the question: how can we teach pupils’ brains to learn, if we ourselves aren’t taught how brains learn? And if we don’t know how our brains’ ability to learn is affected by stress, the school environment, and the mindset and mood that the teacher situates learning in, how can we expect teachers to deliver high quality education? There is currently almost no mention of the brain, or any neuroscience, in the vast majority of Initial Teacher Training programmes; those that do receive it then go on to find themselves in schools where they are a minority and it’s hard to get their voices heard. And how many INSET providers deliver high-quality neuroscientific, psychological and educational research findings? And are qualified to do so? Imagine if we were able to give all teachers a toolkit and an educational structure, based on how their pupils’ brains actually think and work. NeuroFiles Education content is regularly reviewed by a panel of academics working in the field, many well-known even beyond their area of expertise. We include nothing that is not rooted in peer-reviewed scientific research, and share our growing bank of findings with you. Rebecca and David have a wealth of experience – in classroom teaching, as head of department, with published educational research and as advisers on educational policy – we find our combined experience is both invaluable and exclusive.